Typical Vertical Bracing Connections Compression Struts with Splice Plates

These heavy-duty bracings are generally designed to work in compression, with the tensile stress being considered insignificant and largely ignored. Such bracing is often used in structures which are subject to high lateral loads, particularly in areas which are subject to seismic activity. The joint ends should be faced for full bearing, but this can …

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Typical Vertical Bracing Connections Compression Struts with End-Plates

Theses heavy-duty bracings are generally designed to work in compression only, with the tensile stress being considered insignificant and largely ignored. Such bracing is often used in structures which are subject to high lateral loads, particularly in areas which are subject to seismic activity. The joint between the flanges must be true and square in …

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Typical Vertical Bracing Connections Heavy-Duty All Bolted

The following typical connections apply to –I- or –H- profile bracing which may be subject to tension or compression. The flange angles are bolted to the gusset plate and site-bolted to bracing member on erection. This all-bolted option allows for some fabrication alignment (but not much) as the bolt clearance holes will allow for some …

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Typical Vertical Bracing Connections Heavy-Duty Bolted / Welded

The following typical connections apply to –I- or –H- profile bracing which may be subject to tension or compression. The flange plates are slotted to ‘wrap around’ the gusset plate and shop welded in position. The bracing members are then site-bolted to the flange and web plates. Any misalignment may be compensated for by allowing …

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Typical Vertical Bracing Connections Single and Double (Battened) Channels

The following typical connections are for channel section bracing which may be either single or doubled back-to-back, being the more common. This type of bracing usually requires a double row of bolts equally spaced about the centre-line of the bracing member. The general rules-of-thumb for the spacing of the battens applying to Angle bracing may …

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Typical Vertical Bracing Connections Double (Starred) Angles

The following typical connections are for double (starred) angles connected by means of Gusset Plates – To ensure the angles work together as a single unit they should be joined together by means of battens, which are fabricated spacers placed at intervals along the bracing member’s length. Star-Battens will be looked at later in this …

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Typical Vertical Bracing Connections Double (Battened) Angles

The following typical connections are for double (back-to-back) angles connected by means of Gusset Plates – To ensure the angles work together as a single unit they should be joined together by mean of battens, which are fabricated spacers placed at intervals along the bracing member’s length. Back-to-Back Battens will be looked at later in …

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